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Tracy van der Schyff

Facilitating The Evolution of Human Capabilities

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Microsoft Power Platform: Introduction to Power Automate (Flow)

People are afraid that robots will take their jobs. I cannot wait. I’m SO over doing the same things over and over. #Microsoft #PowerAutomate gives end users the ability to automate tasks for themselves. Yes really, but with all things you need to put some effort in to figure out how it works. Let’s get started.

Disclaimer:  The purpose of this blog series is not to create experts, but create curious, self-learning #HumansofIT, not afraid to try, fail and learn. Focus is to enable #CitizenDevelopers (non developers) to add extra to ordinary and become EXTRAORDINARY. All humans have the ability to be great, it’s fear of failing and the unknown that keeps us back. If that’s the only thing I can achieve, to break down your fear of technical concepts, then my work here is done 🙂

Microsoft Power Automate

Power Automate is an online workflow service that automates actions across the most common apps and services. For example, you can create a flow that adds a lead to Microsoft Dynamics 365 and a record in MailChimp whenever someone with more than 100 followers tweets about your company. Read more here..

What you should know

  • Power Automate was called Flow first, so if you pick up some conflicting names, that’s why. You can read more here.
  • Power Automate has different licensing options, which we’ll discuss in another blog. Any examples etc. I do in future (or past blogs) is with the license that’s included in my #Office365, not the standalone Plan.
  • Don’t think of Power Automate as something that only builds those BIG workflows – onboarding, leave applications etc. I’ve always focussed on the Quick Wins, and that means we’ll be looking at small, simple workflows that can improve your everyday life and maybe that of your team. As your maturity and experience level grows, you can start investigating the processes that affect everyone in the company.
  • Flow works with connectors (think of them as the translators that speaks the different language of the apps / services you want to connect to – OneDrive, SharePoint, Teams, Outlook, Twitter, YouTube etc.)
  • Microsoft has create many preconfigured templates that you can use to get started.
  • You cannot create workflows on an account or service that you do not have access to (permissions). For example, you cannot create a workflow that does things on the emails or OneDrive of your boss. #JustSaying 🙂
  • Power Automate is available in the web and on mobile.

We’ll start with the basics today, and that’s to investigate the menus when you sign into flow.

How do you sign in?

https://flow.microsoft.com/ or got to https://Office.com and log in with your Office 365 credentials (email / password), then navigate to the Power Automate App.

But first, a quick overview from the Power Automate YouTube Channel:

Below you’ll find my Infographic Quick Reference on the menus in Power Automate. Yup, I know it’s a lot, but I promise it will all soon make sense to you. Tomorrow we’ll cover the templates and connectors available.

Other blogs in this #PowerPlatform series:

  1. Getting Started with the Microsoft Power Platform
  2. Microsoft Power Platform: What is Power BI?
  3. Microsoft Power Platform: Using Power BI on different platforms / devices
  4. Microsoft Power Platform: Introduction to Power Automate (Flow)
  5. Power Platform: What are the connectors & triggers in Power Automate?
  6. Power Platform: How to use Templates in Power Automate

Community = #LearningThroughSharing

Power Automate Specific 

Twitter handles to follow:

  • Microsoft Power Virtual Agents @MSPowerVirtual
  • Microsoft Power Apps @MSPowerApps
  • Microsoft Power Automate @MSPowerAutomate
  • Microsoft Power BI @MSPowerBI
  • Dynamics 365 @MSFTDynamics365
  • Microsoft Azure @Azure
  • Office 365 @Office365
  • Microsoft @Microsoft
  • Tech Community @MSTCommunity

See you tomorrow… 🙂


Moving to the Cloud or stuck somewhere without adoption? Contact me for a FREE 60 minute, Microsoft 365 Immersion Experience.

Disclaimer: I create content about Office / Microsoft 365. Content is accurate at time of publication, however updates and new additions happen daily which could change the accuracy or relevance. Please keep this in mind when using my blogs as guidelines. And yes, I change my mind all the time as well, because “The only thing that is constant, is change”.
My life mission is to “Facilitate the evolution of human capabilities”: Reach out on: Website > LinkedIn > SlideShare > Twitter > Medium > YouTube > MVP Profile > Contact Me

#Microsoft365 Day 112 – Publish your Microsoft Flows to Team Flows

#Microsoft365 #Office365 #MSFlow You might have noticed the “My Flows” and “Team Flows” options on your My Flows page. This has nothing to do with Microsoft Teams and everything to do with ‘sharing’ your Flows with other people, by making them co-owners.

For previous posts in my #Microsoft365Challenge go to the index page.

DISCLAIMER:  I WRITE ARTICLES ABOUT OFFICE / MICROSOFT 365. CONTENT IS ACCURATE AT TIME OF PUBLICATION, HOWEVER UPDATES AND NEW ADDITIONS HAPPEN DAILY WHICH COULD CHANGE THE ACCURACY OR RELEVANCE. PLEASE KEEP THIS IN MIND WHEN USING MY BLOGS AS GUIDELINES.

Microsoft Flow

Microsoft Flow is a service that helps you create automated workflows between your favorite apps and services to synchronize files, get notifications, collect data, and more. Read article...

The Flows you create:

When creating Flows these will normally appear under your “My Flows”. Therefor each person will see different Flows when signed into the portal. When creating Flows for personal use, this is fine. However, when creating Flows for a department / team it’s not a good idea.

For example, you’ve created a flow that monitors files uploaded to a folder in your Microsoft Teams library. It then runs approvals and then moves it to a different folder. On a bright sunny day, you win the lottery, scream for joy and run away.

Now what about that Flow (on your name)?

So, when creating flows on behalf of other people, I suggest adding other owners to these Flows.

Assign other Owners:

Click on the Flow to open (not the edit button on the right):

Here you’ll see the Connections as well as the owners of the Flow (the person who created it will appear here). Click on Add another owner. This will allow for you to add a team of people responsible for supporting or updating the Flows:

Once you’ve added more owners to your Flow, it will not appear under “My Flows” anymore, but will now appear under “Team Flows”. Keep in mind that these Owners will be able to make changes and delete the Flow:

And there you have it. Sorted. Now stop carrying the world on your own shoulders, we’re supposed to help each other and do this together 🙂


Purpose of this blog challenge:  I will write 365 blogs in 365 days around Microsoft 365. I did a similar challenge with Office 365, blogs can be found here. I won’t just be talking about the new Microsoft 365 subscription model. I will be sharing any news, tips and tricks around Office / Office 365 / Windows / Mobility and Security. And let’s not forget all the great new Apps & services available.  A lot of what I’ll share on Office and SharePoint will also be applicable to none “Office 365” versions.

Power Platform: Troubleshoot your Power Automate workflow Errors

Always remember that failing is a necessary step to success. Now that you’re building some great #PowerAutomate flows, you’re sure to have errors you need to investigate / troubleshoot. Let’s look at the ways to investigate and I’ll share more resources for those days when you run out of options. #PowerPlatform #PowerAddicts

Disclaimer:  The purpose of this #PowerPlatform 1 month blog series is not to create experts, but create curious, self-learning #HumansofIT, not afraid to try, fail and learn. Focus is to enable #CitizenDevelopers (non developers) to add extra to ordinary and become EXTRAORDINARY. All humans have the ability to be great, it’s fear of failing and the unknown that keeps us back. If that’s the only thing I can achieve, to break down your fear of technical concepts, then my work here is done 🙂

Notifications

The nice thing is you’ll get an email if a flow fails. You can also monitor these on your mobile app. That’s why it’s important to give your workflows good names – it helps to know when it doesn’t have a generic name from the template.


Troubleshooting the error

When you check the runs per flow, you’ll see the error and can investigate by clicking on the run to open it:

It identifies the step where it failed and most of the time gives enough of a description for your to troubleshoot:

Most of the time my errors are from copying actions and forgetting to rename the action to be the correct reference used in the function / condition.

Resubmit after changes are made

When you make changes to your flow you can rerun (resubmit) it with the existing data:


Connections

Another error I get often is when my connections no longer authenticate. Perhaps you changed your Twitter / YouTube password etc.

Navigate to Data > Connections to check and refresh these.


Flow Checker

While building your flows you can use the Flow Checker function to see if it picks up any errors. I always make small changes and save first to troubleshoot. It’s much easier to fix one thing, than troubleshooting a whole sequence of actions that’s gone wrong.

No Joy?

So you’ve tried everything and you’re just not sure what’s broken? First step is to go to Support. See if others have the same issues and log a ticket if necessary. The community is unbelievably helpful as well, sometimes I just share a screenshot on Twitter and people respond with suggestions. Here’s an article as well to help you troubleshoot.


Other blogs in this 1 month #PowerPlatform series:

  1. Getting Started with the Microsoft Power Platform
  2. Microsoft Power Platform: What is Power BI?
  3. Microsoft Power Platform: Using Power BI on different platforms / devices
  4. Microsoft Power Platform: Introduction to Power Automate (Flow)
  5. Power Platform: What are the connectors & triggers in Power Automate?
  6. Power Platform: How to use Templates in Power Automate
  7. Power Platform: Save email attachments to OneDrive with Power Automate
  8. Power Platform: Create a Power Automate workflow from scratch
  9. Power Platform: Post selected Tweets from Twitter to Yammer with Power Automate
  10. Power Platform: Use Power Automate to save email attachments to Microsoft Teams
  11. Power Platform: Approve and move documents to other folders with Power Automate
  12. Power Platform: Create a Leave Request SharePoint List and setup approvals with Power Automate
  13. Power Platform: Share, Save As, Send a Copy & Export Power Automate Workflows

Community = #LearningThroughSharing

Power Automate Specific 

Twitter handles to follow:

  • Microsoft Power Virtual Agents @MSPowerVirtual
  • Microsoft Power Apps @MSPowerApps
  • Microsoft Power Automate @MSPowerAutomate
  • Microsoft Power BI @MSPowerBI
  • Dynamics 365 @MSFTDynamics365
  • Microsoft Azure @Azure
  • Office 365 @Office365
  • Microsoft @Microsoft
  • Tech Community @MSTCommunity

See you tomorrow… 🙂


Moving to the Cloud or stuck somewhere without adoption? Contact me for a FREE 60 minute, Microsoft 365 Immersion Experience.

Disclaimer: I create content about Office / Microsoft 365. Content is accurate at time of publication, however updates and new additions happen daily which could change the accuracy or relevance. Please keep this in mind when using my blogs as guidelines. And yes, I change my mind all the time as well, because “The only thing that is constant, is change”.
My life mission is to “Facilitate the evolution of human capabilities”: Reach out on: Website > LinkedIn > SlideShare > Twitter > Medium > YouTube > MVP Profile > Contact Me

Power Platform: Share, Save As, Send a Copy & Export Power Automate Workflows

In #PowerAutomate we have the ability to Share (Team Flows), Save As, Send a Copy & Export our workflows. Let’s take a look at these and why / how you would use them. #PowerPlatform #PowerAddicts

Disclaimer:  The purpose of this #PowerPlatform 1 month blog series is not to create experts, but create curious, self-learning #HumansofIT, not afraid to try, fail and learn. Focus is to enable #CitizenDevelopers (non developers) to add extra to ordinary and become EXTRAORDINARY. All humans have the ability to be great, it’s fear of failing and the unknown that keeps us back. If that’s the only thing I can achieve, to break down your fear of technical concepts, then my work here is done 🙂

Share your Power Automate

I would use this to make other team members co-owners. Be careful to share workflows that includes connectors to your personal content (Email / OneDrive etc.). 

In this screenshot you’ll see workflows that I’ve shared with Braam. We can now both see those workflows in the “Team Flows” section. This allows Braam to also monitor the process or errors on flows as well as make changes. I always suggest sharing workflows that are built on content / processes that a group of people use together. You should not be the only owner for team related processes, what if you win the lotto and run away??

Save As your Power Automate

Save As allows me to make a copy of a workflow that I want to reuse / modify for another scenario. It’s kinda like creating your own templates for reuse. You will change the name of the copy and modify any actions or references etc. necessary for the new workflow.

Send a Copy of your Power Automate

This option will send a link to the person you shared it with. It gives them a copy of your workflow to change as necessary.

Here’s what the mail looks like. Once Braam clicks the “Create My Flows” button in the mail it then opens the Power Automate for him to make the changes he needs and save as a workflow for himself.

Sending a copy of a flow means that recipients will be able to create their own copies of the original flow. These copies will use the recipient’s connections and be owned by the recipient if they want to make changes after creating the flow. Read more…

Export your Power Automate

This option allows you to export a workflow and import it on a different tenant.

Here’s a video from Shane Young (@ShanesCows) on the #PowerApps Community that shows you how to do that:

Other blogs in this 1 month #PowerPlatform series:

  1. Getting Started with the Microsoft Power Platform
  2. Microsoft Power Platform: What is Power BI?
  3. Microsoft Power Platform: Using Power BI on different platforms / devices
  4. Microsoft Power Platform: Introduction to Power Automate (Flow)
  5. Power Platform: What are the connectors & triggers in Power Automate?
  6. Power Platform: How to use Templates in Power Automate
  7. Power Platform: Save email attachments to OneDrive with Power Automate
  8. Power Platform: Create a Power Automate workflow from scratch
  9. Power Platform: Post selected Tweets from Twitter to Yammer with Power Automate
  10. Power Platform: Use Power Automate to save email attachments to Microsoft Teams
  11. Power Platform: Approve and move documents to other folders with Power Automate
  12. Power Platform: Create a Leave Request SharePoint List and setup approvals with Power Automate

Community = #LearningThroughSharing

Power Automate Specific 

Twitter handles to follow:

  • Microsoft Power Virtual Agents @MSPowerVirtual
  • Microsoft Power Apps @MSPowerApps
  • Microsoft Power Automate @MSPowerAutomate
  • Microsoft Power BI @MSPowerBI
  • Dynamics 365 @MSFTDynamics365
  • Microsoft Azure @Azure
  • Office 365 @Office365
  • Microsoft @Microsoft
  • Tech Community @MSTCommunity

See you tomorrow… 🙂


Moving to the Cloud or stuck somewhere without adoption? Contact me for a FREE 60 minute, Microsoft 365 Immersion Experience.

Disclaimer: I create content about Office / Microsoft 365. Content is accurate at time of publication, however updates and new additions happen daily which could change the accuracy or relevance. Please keep this in mind when using my blogs as guidelines. And yes, I change my mind all the time as well, because “The only thing that is constant, is change”.
My life mission is to “Facilitate the evolution of human capabilities”: Reach out on: Website > LinkedIn > SlideShare > Twitter > Medium > YouTube > MVP Profile > Contact Me

#Microsoft365 Day 193: Communication options with Microsoft Kaizala, Flow & Teams

#Microsoft365 #Office365 #Kaizala #MicrosoftTeams #MicrosoftFlow I’ve been the biggest fan of Microsoft Teams (6 months after) it got launched. I do still feel there’s a place for quick messages within a Team and also for larger groups of people who don’t belong to a Microsoft Team. Kaizala is a mobile app used for large group communications. Let me show you how to make Kaizala talk to Teams if you still want a thread of those conversations in your Team as well.

 

For previous posts in my #Microsoft365Challenge go to the index page.

DISCLAIMER:  I WRITE ARTICLES ABOUT OFFICE / MICROSOFT 365. CONTENT IS ACCURATE AT TIME OF PUBLICATION, HOWEVER UPDATES AND NEW ADDITIONS HAPPEN DAILY WHICH COULD CHANGE THE ACCURACY OR RELEVANCE. PLEASE KEEP THIS IN MIND WHEN USING MY BLOGS AS GUIDELINES.

Microsoft Kaizala:

Microsoft Kaizala is a mobile app and service designed for large group communications and work management. Kaizala makes it easy to connect and coordinate work with your entire value chain, including field employees, vendors, partners, and customers wherever they are. Read more…

Here’s a great post by Loryan Strant:  First Experiences with Microsoft Kaizala to give you more information about using Kaizala.

Steps:

  • Install Kaizala on your mobile phone
  • Setup a Group and add members
  • Create a Microsoft Team and channel (or reference existing)
  • Create new Flow using Kaizala & Teams connectors

Flow:

In Flow I created from blank template, using the Kaizala New Message as trigger. See all the triggers available:

I referenced the Group on Kaizala, then added an action to Post a Message to a Microsoft Team Channel. In the Message you can compose it with the dynamic content received from the Kaizala message:

Microsoft Teams:

After saving the Flow, I then posted a message on Kaizala on my mobile (to that Group I referenced). Here you’ll see the message on my Mobile and the message posted in my Microsoft Team Channel:

Voila!!! 

Stay hungry, keep on learning!! 🙂


Purpose of this blog challenge:  I will write 365 blogs in 365 days around Microsoft 365. I did a similar challenge with Office 365, blogs can be found here. I won’t just be talking about the new Microsoft 365 subscription model. I will be sharing any news, tips and tricks around Office / Office 365 / Windows / Mobility and Security. And let’s not forget all the great new Apps & services available.  A lot of what I’ll share on Office and SharePoint will also be applicable to none “Office 365” versions.

You can also find me contributing to REgarding 365. I’m a member of a group of enthusiasts, sharing their stories, thoughts and opinions about Microsoft 365. Catch us at https://regarding365.com | @regarding365 on Twitter and regarding365 on YouTube 


Want to work with me? You’re welcome to CONTACT ME:

(If it’s related to a specific blog, rather comment on the actual blog please – do not send an email)

#Microsoft365 Day 168: Analyse sentiment with Microsoft Flow and Azure

In my previous blog I showed you how to create the Text Analytics API in Azure. Now we’ll use this to detect sentiment of text in Microsoft Flow. We’ll also post a comment to our Microsoft Teams channel if the score is considered negative. Thanks to @CloudGuy_Pro for showing me these cool features. #Community #LearningThroughSharing

Purpose of this blog challenge:  I will write 365 blogs in 365 days around Microsoft 365. I did a similar challenge with Office 365, blogs can be found  https://tracyvanderschyff.com/microsoft-365/ . I won’t just be talking about the new Microsoft 365 subscription model. I will be sharing any news, tips and tricks around Office / Office 365 / Windows / Mobility and Security. And let’s not forget all the great new Apps & services available.  A lot of what I’ll share on Office and SharePoint will also be applicable to none “Office 365” versions.

“You can also find me contributing to REgarding 365. I’m a member of a group of enthusiasts, sharing their stories, thoughts and opinions about Microsoft 365. Catch us at https://regarding365.com | @regarding365 on Twitter and regarding365 on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/regarding365

Disclaimer:  I create content about Office / Microsoft 365. Content is accurate at time of publication, however updates and new additions happen daily which could change the accuracy or relevance. Please keep this in mind when using my blogs as guidelines.

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