Around the Office in 365 Days: Day 210 – Default permission levels in SharePoint

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 #Office365Challenge Today’s post is special, not because it’s the 210th one in a row, or because it’s about permissions. It’s the first blog post I’ve written away from home, which is South Africa, and that’s kinda special to me.

Day: 210 of 365, 155 left
Tools: SharePoint
Description: Default permission levels in SharePoint

Yup, it’s 26 September 2016, I’m in Atlanta, attending Ignite. It’s 11pm and I’m exhausted after a first day of conference. I cannot begin to explain the magnitude of the conference, but what I can do is express my gratitude towards GTconsult for making it all possible.


My next couple of posts will be all about the permissions in SharePoint, today we’ll cover the default permission levels.

Permission levels are common levels of permissions which can be assigned to single users as well as groups of users. These levels consist of various permissions or attributes ‘grouped’ to make up a level.

Below you will see the different levels. These can be modified (except Full Control and Limited Access). I do suggest making a copy of a level and then applying changes. For example:  ‘Contribute cannot delete’ will be a copy of the Contribute level, with the delete actions removed. I will show you how to do this in a separate post.

Permission Level Description
Full Control Contains all available SharePoint permissions. By default, this permission level is assigned to the Owners group. It can’t be customized or deleted.
Design Create lists and document libraries, edit pages and apply themes, borders, and style sheets on the site. There is no SharePoint group that is assigned this permission level automatically.
Edit Add, edit, and delete lists; view, add, update, and delete list items and documents. By default, this permission level is assigned to the Members group.
Contribute View, add, update, and delete list items and documents.
Read View pages and items in existing lists and document libraries and download documents.
Limited Access Enables a user or group to browse to a site page or library to access a specific content item when they do not have permissions to open or edit any other items in the site or library. This level is automatically assigned by SharePoint when you provide access to one specific item. You cannot assign Limited Access permissions directly to a user or group yourself. Instead, when you assign edit or open permissions to the single item, SharePoint automatically assigns Limited Access to other required locations, such as the site or library in which the single item is located.
Approve Edit and approve pages, list items, and documents. By default, the Approvers group has this permission.
Manage Hierarchy Create sites and edit pages, list items, and documents. By default, this permission level is assigned to the Hierarchy Managers group.
Restricted Read View pages and documents, but not historical versions or user permissions.
View Only View pages, items, and documents. Any document that has a server-side file handler can be viewed in the browser but not downloaded. File types that do not have a server-side file handler (cannot be opened in the browser), such as video files, .pdf files, and .png files, can still be downloaded.

Note:  Be very careful when assigning Edit / Contribute rights. Users with Edit rights can delete apps as well, whereas users with Contribution rights can only delete content.

Tomorrow we’ll start looking at planning your permissions better and all the considerations.

Overview of my challenge: As an absolute lover of all things Microsoft, I’ve decided to undertake the challenge, of writing a blog every single day, for the next 365 days. Crazy, I know. And I’ll try my best, but if I cannot find something good to say about Office 365 and the Tools it includes for 365 days, I’m changing my profession. So let’s write this epic tale of “Around the Office in 365 Days”. My ode to Microsoft Office 365.

Keep in mind that these tips and tricks do not only apply to Office 365 – but where applicable, to the overall Microsoft Office Suite and SharePoint.

Around the Office in 365 Days: Day 209 – Solution Register in SharePoint Part 2

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 #Office365Challenge In the previous post I shared a very simple custom list with you, which can be used as a Solutions Register. Today we’ll look at the detail as well as the ROI calculations.

Day: 209 of 365, 156 left
Tools:  SharePoint
Description: Solution Registers in SharePoint Part 2

Related posts:

Day 208 Solutions Registers in SharePoint Part 1


Below are the columns I used for the register:
solutions-register-4

Notes:

  1. I build all apps / sites with a Short Acronym for a URL (in the case of Apps I then go rename it later).
  2. Date solution put into production is important, because I want to follow up 3 months later.
  3. Solution owner and Super User is rarely the same person – this detail is important for responsibility as well as the contact to follow up with.
  4. Complexity – here I have a multiple checkbox to identify any ‘complexity’ on the solution. Did we use InfoPath + SharePoint Designer Workflows or Nintex, any custom code added for styling etc.? This helps a lot when doing upgrades as well.
  5. ROI – now this is a very important part, even for users only building small solutions. Every bit adds up. Without this Super users will never get the true value they add AND the SharePoint Team will not be able to motivate for expenditure based on ROI.

Below is a simple example of determining ROI by only looking at minutes saved. You don’t need to know the actual salaries, get an average from HR. Saving a team of people 5 minutes a day doesn’t sound like much – but add that up over a year – WOW! (Calculation based on South African Rands – ZAR).

roi

Please start documenting your solutions today. Even if only on this simple level. Do the ROI calculations. On days when you feel worthless – this helps to remind you.

Catch you tomorrow when I’ll start the journey around permission in SharePoint.

Overview of my challenge: As an absolute lover of all things Microsoft, I’ve decided to undertake the challenge, of writing a blog every single day, for the next 365 days. Crazy, I know. And I’ll try my best, but if I cannot find something good to say about Office 365 and the Tools it includes for 365 days, I’m changing my profession. So let’s write this epic tale of “Around the Office in 365 Days”. My ode to Microsoft Office 365.

Keep in mind that these tips and tricks do not only apply to Office 365 – but where applicable, to the overall Microsoft Office Suite and SharePoint.

Around the Office in 365 Days: Day 208 – Solutions Registers in SharePoint

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#Office365Challenge Now before we start talking about Permissions I want to share the following Governance tip with you. Solution Registers

Day: 208 of 365, 157 left
Tools:  SharePoint
Description: Solutions Registers in SharePoint

We all want people to use SharePoint, and use it well. However – once they start using it – things get out of hand very quickly if you don’t keep your finger on the Governance side of things. Most people don’t know what this entails – and of course we’re all kinda scared of it.

Over the years I’ve developed some easy to use systems to help with Governance, today I’ll share one of those with you, the Solutions register.

As part of my Governance Framework – a business rule is that every solution that is built (even if it’s just a library), should be added on the global Solutions register which sits on the governance portal. This allows for all super users across the business to see what’s being built, helps to not duplicate effort and of course allows transparency for the Site collection admins. I’ve also included the ROI calculation on this form, to force users to think of the money savings, and try to document it as best possible. Because I’ve added complexity tick boxes, it also helps when we do upgrades etc., to know where we have workflows running etc.

solutions-register-1
solutions-register-2 solutions-register-3

These are the columns I used for the Solutions Register:

solutions-register-4

Join me to tomorrow when I’ll take you through the different areas and reasoning behind it, as well as give you some tips on calculating the ROI.

Overview of my challenge: As an absolute lover of all things Microsoft, I’ve decided to undertake the challenge, of writing a blog every single day, for the next 365 days. Crazy, I know. And I’ll try my best, but if I cannot find something good to say about Office 365 and the Tools it includes for 365 days, I’m changing my profession. So let’s write this epic tale of “Around the Office in 365 Days”. My ode to Microsoft Office 365.

Keep in mind that these tips and tricks do not only apply to Office 365 – but where applicable, to the overall Microsoft Office Suite and SharePoint.

Around the Office in 365 Days: Day 207 – Check In and Out of Documents in SharePoint

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 #Office365Challenge Checked out files might just be that one thing that infuriates users the most about SharePoint. and it really is because they don’t understand what it’s all about.

Day: 207 of 365, 158 left
Tools:  SharePoint
Description: Check In and Out of Documents in SharePoint

On SharePoint, you can configure a library to force users to check out files when editing them. This is ideal in environments where users might try to edit the same documents at the same time. You will get a message that says the file is checked out to someone else, and even have the option to be notified when checked back in.

Only once you’ve checked the document back in, will users see the changes you’ve made.

Check in / check out can be enabled on a library by going to library settings > Version settings:

check-out1
To check the document out, click on the ellipses (1), click on the second ellipses (2), then click on advanced (3) > Check Out (4). Checked out files will have a down-pointing green arrow on the icon (5):

check-out-2

You can also check documents in or out by selecting them, then using the menu on the Files Tab (old look libraries). This helps when multiple documents are selected to do “bulk” check-in (not available on new look libraries):
check-out-3
On the new look libraries, the checkout is available on the ellipses > More > Check Out. As the ribbon does not exist, it is not possible to select multiple documents for check in:

check-out-4

Keep in mind that even if check in / check out is not enabled on the library, SharePoint will automatically check out multiple documents dragged into a library which has compulsory fields.

Catch you tomorrow when I’ll start the journey around permission in SharePoint.

Overview of my challenge: As an absolute lover of all things Microsoft, I’ve decided to undertake the challenge, of writing a blog every single day, for the next 365 days. Crazy, I know. And I’ll try my best, but if I cannot find something good to say about Office 365 and the Tools it includes for 365 days, I’m changing my profession. So let’s write this epic tale of “Around the Office in 365 Days”. My ode to Microsoft Office 365.

Keep in mind that these tips and tricks do not only apply to Office 365 – but where applicable, to the overall Microsoft Office Suite and SharePoint.

Around the Office in 365 Days: Day 206 – Use SharePoint to track Stock Levels

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#Office365Challenge In today’s post I’ll show you how to use a Custom List to track and notify you of stock levels.

Day: 206 of 365, 159 left
Tools:  SharePoint
Description: Use SharePoint to track stock levels

In the below example I have an asset list with the following columns:

  1. Asset Number (Title renamed)
  2. Asset Type (Choice)
  3. Stock Qty (Number)
  4. Stock Level (Number)
  5. Reorder Qty (Calculated Stock Level – Stock Qty)
  6. Reorder % (Calculated Reorder Qty divided by Stock Level)

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Because I’ve added the Reorder % column I can now monitor a reorder limit of 30%:

stock-level-2

Next step is create a new view which only shows items with a Reorder % equal to or greater than 30%:
stock-level-3

Now it’s time to setup the alert:

stock-level-4
As we have a filtered view, we can now setup a filtered alert based on that view. So you’ll only receive a mail, when an items reorder % moves above 30:
stock-level-5

Easy right!?!?

Overview of my challenge: As an absolute lover of all things Microsoft, I’ve decided to undertake the challenge, of writing a blog every single day, for the next 365 days. Crazy, I know. And I’ll try my best, but if I cannot find something good to say about Office 365 and the Tools it includes for 365 days, I’m changing my profession. So let’s write this epic tale of “Around the Office in 365 Days”. My ode to Microsoft Office 365.

Keep in mind that these tips and tricks do not only apply to Office 365 – but where applicable, to the overall Microsoft Office Suite and SharePoint.

Around the Office in 365 Days: Day 205 – Description on SharePoint Apps

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#Office365Challenge Today’s post is about the description you add when creating new apps on SharePoint.

Day: 205 of 365, 160 left
Tools:  SharePoint
Description: Description on SharePoint Apps

This functionality is rarely used, and most probably because users do not understand what it can be used for.

When creating new apps on SharePoint – I always complete the description. This is where I add the purpose of the app as well as who the content owner is.

description

In the library / list you’ll see an Information icon next to the App name. When clicked on this, it supplies the user with details on the app:
description2

Sadly….. I don’t see this in the newly updated libraries and lists on O365. Hoping they will add it back.

Overview of my challenge: As an absolute lover of all things Microsoft, I’ve decided to undertake the challenge, of writing a blog every single day, for the next 365 days. Crazy, I know. And I’ll try my best, but if I cannot find something good to say about Office 365 and the Tools it includes for 365 days, I’m changing my profession. So let’s write this epic tale of “Around the Office in 365 Days”. My ode to Microsoft Office 365.

Keep in mind that these tips and tricks do not only apply to Office 365 – but where applicable, to the overall Microsoft Office Suite and SharePoint.

Around the Office in 365 Days: Day 204 – Mailto URL for buttons on SharePoint Pages

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#Office365Challenge Here’s another goodie, and so easy to achieve. Mailto URL’s.

Day: 204 of 365, 161 left
Tools:  SharePoint
Description: Mailto URL for buttons on SharePoint Pages

Mailto URLs are used to create Contact us links (for example) from pages. In this example I’ve designed an email button, which when clicked, will open a new mail to desired recipient. This is actually only an image I designed on PowerPoint and then inserted on the page.

Constructing the mailto link:
New Mail Window + 1 Recipient: (add MailTo: in front of email address – no spaces)
MailTo:tracyvanderschyff@wordpress.com

New Mail Window + 2 Recipients: (use ; to separate – no spaces)
MailTo:tracyvanderschyff@wordpress.com;tracy2vanderschyff@wordpress.com

New Mail Window + 1 Recipient + Email Subject: (add ?Subject=”text” at the back of email address(es) – remember to replace spaces in text with %20)
MailTo:tracyvanderschyff@wordpress.com?Subject=Enquiries%20From%20Blog%20Site

New Mail Window + 1 Recipient + Email Subject + Email Body: (add &body=”text” after the subject – remember to replace spaces in text with %20)
MailTo:tracyvanderschyff@wordpress.com?Subject=Enquiries%20From%20Blog%20Site&body=Hi,%20I%20have%20some%20questions%20regarding%20your%20blog%20site

Once the image is added, add the link to it. The link ribbon will open where you can add the description:
mailto

This is the final product, it will open a new mail, with the Recipient completed, as well as a subject and body (if so configured):
mailto2

How easy was that??!!

Overview of my challenge: As an absolute lover of all things Microsoft, I’ve decided to undertake the challenge, of writing a blog every single day, for the next 365 days. Crazy, I know. And I’ll try my best, but if I cannot find something good to say about Office 365 and the Tools it includes for 365 days, I’m changing my profession. So let’s write this epic tale of “Around the Office in 365 Days”. My ode to Microsoft Office 365.

Keep in mind that these tips and tricks do not only apply to Office 365 – but where applicable, to the overall Microsoft Office Suite and SharePoint.

Around the Office in 365 Days: Day 203 – Reroute Submissions on SharePoint Forms

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#Office365Challenge Today I’ll show you how to manipulate the URL for a form to reroute to another page once submitted.

Day: 203 of 365, 162 left
Tools:  SharePoint
Description: Reroute Submissions on SharePoint Forms

Related posts:

Around the Office in 365 Days: Day 202 – Open list on New Form


With reference to the blog I wrote last night, we’ve created a link to open the new Audit Findings form, not the list.

Add the following behind your URL:  “?Source=URL you want to route to”, for example

https://server/TeamSite/SPS/Lists/AuditFindings/NewForm.aspx?Source=https://server/TeamSite/SPS/

When users click on the link it will open the new form. Once they click OK to submit, it will reroute to the link you added at the end.

VOILA!!

Overview of my challenge: As an absolute lover of all things Microsoft, I’ve decided to undertake the challenge, of writing a blog every single day, for the next 365 days. Crazy, I know. And I’ll try my best, but if I cannot find something good to say about Office 365 and the Tools it includes for 365 days, I’m changing my profession. So let’s write this epic tale of “Around the Office in 365 Days”. My ode to Microsoft Office 365.

Keep in mind that these tips and tricks do not only apply to Office 365 – but where applicable, to the overall Microsoft Office Suite and SharePoint.

Around the Office in 365 Days: Day 202 – Open list on New Form

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#Office365Challenge Today’s tip is very easy to do and adds lots of value for end users.

Day: 202 of 365, 163 left
Tools:  SharePoint
Description: Open List on Newform.aspx

SharePoint might be easy to use, but for people who don’t use it all the time – and those new to SharePoint – it might be daunting. Today’s tip is an easy way to manipulate the experience users have with SharePoint.

Example:  Our company has an Audit Findings Register. I would like to add a link on a page “Click here to add Audit Finding”. What I don’t want is for SharePoint to open the default view, and then the user has to click “New Item” as well.

SharePoint has 3 pages it uses with lists by default:

  • NewForm.aspx – used to add new items
  • EditForm.aspx – used to edit current items
  • DispForm.aspx – used to display current items

Most lists are created with an AllItems.aspx view. You can of course add a new view and set this as default.

Normally you would point users to the “https://server/TeamSite/SPSS/Lists/AuditFindings/AllItems.aspx“. This would take them to the list, where they then have to click “New Item”:

newform1

In this case I’ll make a change. If I change the View name in the URL to Newform.aspx, it will open the New form when users click on the button. “https://server/TeamSite/SPSS/Lists/AuditFindings/NewForm.aspx“. Add this new URL to the button or Promoted Link / Navigation on your landing page and users will get the new form when they click on the link – not the list:

newform2

I know. It’s so easy AND it helps a lot!

Overview of my challenge: As an absolute lover of all things Microsoft, I’ve decided to undertake the challenge, of writing a blog every single day, for the next 365 days. Crazy, I know. And I’ll try my best, but if I cannot find something good to say about Office 365 and the Tools it includes for 365 days, I’m changing my profession. So let’s write this epic tale of “Around the Office in 365 Days”. My ode to Microsoft Office 365.

Keep in mind that these tips and tricks do not only apply to Office 365 – but where applicable, to the overall Microsoft Office Suite and SharePoint.

Around the Office in 365 Days – The Starfish Story

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#Office365Challenge Today’s post is not part of my challenge, but somehow the crazy reasoning behind it.

When I started writing blogs, I didn’t do it so much to help other people – it was merely a creative way to document the things I’d learnt – and to be able to find it again. As I was in a support role back then, it definitely saved time – so many tips and tricks are not documented as quick reference guides, and I was spending a lot of time making screenshots and typing up help emails. When ‘blogged’ I could just send the user a link to the relevant blog. (Great idea for a company by the way – knowledge sharing through blogs, which also doubles up as the documented quick reference guides).

It took me years to realise that I had something to offer. I’m not very technical and cannot code anything from scratch, I don’t understand Kerberos and SQL and I’m still trying to figure out exactly what Hybrid is. And yes – that’s what I measure myself against. Silly right? What I had to share, was everyday stuff, and I thought everyone already knew that – so I didn’t share.

Being a trainer / consultant, I get my inspiration from my students / clients. As time passed, I realised they still had so much to learn (and me from them) – and most probably didn’t have someone to turn to, in times of need. People also don’t have spare days to go sit in training – which was the biggest reasoning behind my crazy #Office365Challenge. Teach them a bit about Office / SharePoint, everyday, for 365 days. Bite sizes. That’s how you eat an elephant right?!🙂

This brings me to the Starfish story. When you write blogs, it’s not about how many people read it. It’s about that one person you could help. Only one. That’s all I need. I have no idea who originally wrote the story below, but I will be using a cartoon by Hugh Macleod (which is where I read it the first time):

While walking along a beach, an elderly gentleman saw someone in the distance leaning down, picking something up and throwing it into the ocean. As he got closer, he noticed that the figure was that of a young boy, picking up starfish one by one and tossing each one gently back into the water.
He came closer still and called out, “Good morning! May I ask what it is that you are doing?” The boy paused, looked up, and replied “Throwing starfish into the ocean.” The old man smiled, and said, “I must ask, then, why are you throwing starfish into the ocean?”
To this, he boy replied, “The sun is up and the tide is going out. If I don’t throw them in, they’ll die.”
Upon hearing this, the elderly observer commented, “But, do you not realise that there are miles and miles of beach and there are starfish all along every mile? You can’t possibly make a difference!”
The young man listened politely. Then he bent down, picked up another starfish, threw it back into the ocean past the breaking waves and said, “It surely made a difference for that one.”

starfish

So there you go: “Every time I write a new blog, I’m throwing another starfish back into the water.”

We all have people we look up to. The people we reach out to when we’re stuck. This brings me to the SharePoint (Office365) Community. Without them I’d be lost. This is my power source where I recharge my battery.

I was interviewed by 2GuysAndSharePoint (@2GuysSharePoint, @AlistairPugin, @OddRodlin) yesterday, which is what inspired this blog. What a great idea!! They’re committing to one podcast a week. I’m really looking forward to seeing what they’re up to next. I heard a rumour that they might be doing some podcasts at the SA SharePoint Saturdays. That would be a lot of fun!

2guysandsharepoint

Information Worker happens every month (second Tuesday) in Cape Town and Johannesburg at Microsoft. “The only true SharePoint and Office 365 community in South Africa, For the people, By the people. No Sales pitches, No Showboating, No Company fronting.”

SharePoint Saturday Events (SPS Events) is a FREE one-day event held in different cities around the world, featuring sessions from influential and respected SharePoint professionals.” Johannesburg 8 Oct. 2016 #SPSJHB, Cape Town 22 Oct. 2016 #SPSCPT, and Durban 29 Oct. 2016 #SPSDBN. Please go register and join us on a wonderful, fun filled day of Learning through Sharing.

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And then of course, in one week I’ll be at Ignite – Whoooooop!!! I’m so excited.

Please support the people out there who makes the community great and who does their part by giving back. In the end, we all have something to learn from each other. That’s what life is all about.

Overview of my challenge: As an absolute lover of all things Microsoft, I’ve decided to undertake the challenge, of writing a blog every single day, for the next 365 days. Crazy, I know. And I’ll try my best, but if I cannot find something good to say about Office 365 and the Tools it includes for 365 days, I’m changing my profession. So let’s write this epic tale of “Around the Office in 365 Days”. My ode to Microsoft Office 365.

Keep in mind that these tips and tricks do not only apply to Office 365 – but where applicable, to the overall Microsoft Office Suite and SharePoint.